05/26/21

The Denver Gazette wrote a story on May 18 recognizing Wilder student and cancer survivor Gray Giannotti and her work with Arapahoe High School as her desired child. Gray has been saving and planning with some pretty big ideas for the past three years. In mid-May, she, her family, and some Arapahoe students distributed blankets, water, and toys to needy locals as part of Grey’s Blanket Drive. As part of their annual Wish Week program, AHS students raised over $ 24,000 to send Gray and her family to Disney World and donated hundreds of blankets to Grey’s Blanket Drive.

This is a great job and we are so proud to have such caring and thoughtful people as part of our LPS community.

The text of the article was published below with permission from the Denver Gazette

LITTLETON – For more than three years, 8-year-old Gray Giannotti has been saving every penny of her birthday, Christmas and even tooth fairy money for something big.

Initially, the cancer survivor wanted to help her father Joshua retire early. After Gray realized this was not possible, she focused on helping the homeless in her community.

But their new goal of buying a home for every homeless person was a little too high. So Gray turned back. On Tuesday, she, her family, and a dozen or so students from Arapahoe High School took to the cool, damp streets to distribute blankets, water, and toys to needy locals.

“It has been raining and snowing a lot lately, so I only want to keep people who are homeless from freezing to death,” said Gray Giannotti.

Although Gray and her family have been saving up blankets for the homeless since 2018, Grey’s Blanket Drive would not have been possible without Arapahoe High School.

With the help of students from Arapahoe High School, eight-year-old Gray Gianotti collected blankets to donate to people who are homeless in the Denver area.

Last month, Warrior Gray students and staff were featured for their annual Wish Week, which raises funds to help a Make-A-Wish Colorado child achieve their goal. During the week, the high school managed not only to raise over $ 24,000 to send the Giannottis to Disney World for a week-long adventure – Grey’s dream – but also to donate hundreds of blankets to Grey’s cause.

“We decided to take a round trip to see where it was taking us and it was far more successful than we thought,” said Matthew Becker, senior and president of the Arapahoe Student Union. “Donating them and actually being face to face with people and hearing their stories and seeing them in person is what Gray loves, so in the spirit of Gray we thought that today is a great way to do it . “

The Giannottis and students gathered and drove through Littleton, the South Metro and Denver on Tuesday looking for people in need.

The Giannottis stopped by the roadside to hand someone a blanket and water in Littleton. Elsewhere, like near East Colfax Avenue and Interstate 225, they pulled into a parking lot and walked several blocks in the drizzle to offer resources to three people they saw on the exit.

Eventually the family ended up near Colorado Children’s Hospital, where Gray endured eight months of hell – chemotherapy, endless doctor’s appointments, and the collapse of one of their lower vertebrae.

This time, however, the situation was happier. The family donated to the Aurora Day Resource Center, which helps every homeless person regardless of the situation, said Jason Goertz, the volunteer coordinator of the Mile High Behavioral Healthcare, which runs the center.

“It is very inspiring for us and brings us a lot of hope and joy that this little girl and her family think of and who are ready to help a population that is normally pushed to the margins of society,” said Goertz.

Grey’s Blanket Drive inspired not only those who received the donations, but also the students, teachers, and community members involved in Grey’s mission.

For many students it meant leaving their comfort zone for a few hours to take care of “forgotten people”.

“It’s easy to get stuck in our own little bladder,” said Becker. “It is important to recognize and embrace the diversity and cultures that we have in the city.”

In total, Gray, her family, and students were handing out hundreds of blankets and resources on Tuesday. But their mission is not complete. Gray plans to continue saving her money on additional blankets for future events.

“This is a really rare situation in which the desired child gives something back to the community in such a big way,” said Daria Meske, treasurer of the upper class. “Meetings like this really help us see the difference we can make in our community.”

The Denver Gazette wrote a story on May 18 recognizing Wilder student and cancer survivor Gray Giannotti and her work with Arapahoe High School as her desired child. Gray has been saving and planning with some pretty big ideas for the past three years. In mid-May, she, her family and some Arapahoe students distributed blankets, water and toys to needy locals as part of Grey’s Blanket Drive. As part of their annual Wish Week program, AHS students raised over $ 24,000 to send Gray and her family to Disney World and donated hundreds of blankets to Grey’s Blanket Drive.

This is a great job and we are so proud to have such caring and thoughtful people as part of our LPS community.

The text of the article was published below with permission from the Denver Gazette

LITTLETON – 8 year old Gray Giannotti has been saving every penny of her birthday, Christmas and even tooth fairy money for something big for more than three years.

Initially, the cancer survivor wanted to help her father Joshua retire early. After realizing that wasn’t possible, Gray shifted her focus to helping the homeless in her community.

But their new goal of buying a home for every homeless person was a little too high. So Gray turned back. On Tuesday, she took her family and around a dozen students from Arapahoe High School onto the cool, damp streets to distribute blankets, water, and toys to needy locals.

“It has been raining and snowing a lot lately, so I only want to keep people who are homeless from freezing to death,” said Gray Giannotti.

Although Gray and her family have been saving up blankets for the homeless since 2018, Grey’s Blanket Drive would not have been possible without Arapahoe High School.

With the help of students from Arapahoe High School, eight-year-old Gray Gianotti collected blankets to donate to people who are homeless in the Denver area.

Last month, Warrior Gray students and staff were featured for their annual Wish Week, which raises funds for a Make-A-Wish Colorado child to help achieve their goal. During the week, the high school managed not only to raise over $ 24,000 to send the Giannottis to Disney World for a week-long adventure – Grey’s dream – but also to donate hundreds of blankets to Grey’s cause.

“We decided to start a package tour to see where it was going and it was a lot more successful than we thought,” said Matthew Becker, Arapahoe Senior and Student Union President. “Donating them and actually getting in touch with people and hearing their stories and seeing them in person is what we know Gray loves. In the spirit of Gray we thought this was a great way to do this today to do.”

The Giannottis and students banded together and drove via Littleton, the South Subway and Denver on Tuesday to search for people in need.

The Giannottis stopped by the roadside to hand someone a blanket and water in Littleton. In other locations, like the area near East Colfax Avenue and Interstate 225, they pulled into a parking lot and walked several blocks in the drizzle to offer resources to three people they saw on the exit.

Eventually the family ended up near Colorado Children’s Hospital, where Gray endured eight months of hell – chemotherapy, endless doctor’s appointments, and the collapse of one of her lower vertebrae.

This time, however, the situation was happier. The family donated at the Aurora Day Resource Center, which helps all homeless people regardless of the situation, said Jason Goertz, the volunteer coordinator for Mile High Behavioral Healthcare that runs the center.

“It is very inspiring for us and brings us a lot of hope and joy that this little girl and her family think of and who are ready to help a population that is normally pushed to the margins of society,” said Goertz.

Grey’s Blanket Drive inspired not only those who received the donations, but also the students, teachers, and community members involved in Grey’s mission.

For many students, this has meant getting out of their comfort zones for a few hours to take care of “forgotten people”.

“It’s easy to get stuck in our own little bladder,” said Becker. “It is important to recognize and embrace the diversity and cultures that we have in the city.”

In total, Gray, her family, and students were handing out hundreds of blankets and resources on Tuesday. But their mission is not complete. Gray plans to continue saving her money on additional blankets for future events.

“This is a really rare situation in which the desired child gives something back to the community in such a big way,” said Daria Meske, treasurer of the upper class. “Meetings like this really help us see the difference we can make in our community.”

This news release was produced by the Littleton 6 School District. The views expressed here are the author’s own.